Spinning Off A Related Business

The Limitations of Interdependence

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InterdependenceWhat do you think? Will Joe stay or leave?

And, more importantly, what would you do?

Joe had worked in the operations side of his uncles’ technology company for ten years before he told them that he wanted to run his own business.

Good for Joe. That conversation led to the creation of an installation company that was actually separate from the base business, and Joe had his opportunity to be a President. Since they financed the startup, Joe’s uncles owned the new installation business. Within a few years, Joe became a minority shareholder. Today with ten more years now under his belt, Joe and his uncles have equal shares.

Whether you handle computers, telephones, furniture, sun rooms or sound systems, growing an installation business has its challenges. It’s labor-intensive with lots of moving parts, conflicting schedules, union versus non-union jobs, tight budgets, high expectations and too little control over what’s promised.

Installers are dependent on salespeople to make reasonable commitments. In a highly competitive environment, that becomes almost impossible. To get the account or the project, a sales person can feel forced to agree to just about any demand. This pressure is tough enough to handle when the installers are in a department within the core business. Installers in a separate business are dependent on promises made by salespeople in someone else’s company.

So Joe and his uncles negotiated a deal to help the companies be interdependent. The core technology company would get discount pricing and give Joe’s business right of first refusal on their installations. For a few years, the majority of Joe’s installation projects came from the family’s technology business. However, he wanted to grow his business faster and learn how to work with a broad range of customers. Joe can’t hire, train or supervise the sales people in the technology company, but he can develop his own sales department. Today, less than 20% of Joe’s business comes from his uncles’ technology company. Hmm…They are his partners. That could be awkward.

Who gets to decide which companies Joe’s salespeople can approach? What about companies that directly compete with the family-owned technology company? How many other customers can be extended the right-of-first-refusal discount before its value is diluted? Have the installers lost the influence they once had with the technology company salespeople? If the promises made by the family-owned technology business become unacceptable, could Joe charge them more money? Could Joe ever buy his uncles’ shares and become the majority owner? If the family-owned technology company continued to be his largest customer, could Joe change his pricing? If independence is Joe’s primary life goal, could he focus “his” installation company on completely different products or customers than the family-owned technology business?

What do you think? Will Joe stay or leave?

And, more importantly, what would you do?

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